• Harvest Batch #

    Chaga Harvest Batch #0319

    I went out to gather batch # 0319 near Searchmont on March 29th and 30th, for four hours on both days. It was the time of year when walking in the bush takes a whole lot more energy than it usually does.  We tend to avoid wildcrafting during the spring melt because it’s just too hard to make good ground and there are potential opportunities for injury hidden everywhere beneath the soggy snow.  However last winter, Braidy and I were living totally different lives than usual and before we knew it, the melt had already begun.  We were living and working in Searchmont, a small ski community near Sault Ste.…

  • Harvest Batch #

    Chaga Harvest Batch #1018

    We ventured out into the woods on Oct. 30th in search of the fungus that some people call the fountain of youth.  After 3 hours, we headed back home with 3.5 lbs of Chaga.  As the mushroom loses about 1/3 of it’s weight while drying, this is a very small haul.  Although unusual, we do occasionally come home with very light or even empty backpacks after a day of bushwacking.  This is simply a part of foraging.  In contrast, sometimes we find so much, we can’t fit it all into our bags.  November 4, 2018 was one of those very bountiful trips into the bush.  We headed out into crown…

  • Harvest Batch #

    Chaga Harvest Batch #0818

    It was a cool, breezy day on August 23rd when Braidy and I embarked upon the Chaga hunt that created Harvest batch #0818.  With the added charm of a colourful array of autumn leaves scattering the forest floor, we happily headed out into the bush close to home, in the Township of Day and Bright. As we typically find most Chaga flourishing along the edges of various waterways, we followed what appeared to be an intermittent stream on the edge of a Hemlock and Cedar swamp.  In contrast to our last harvest, we found all of this Chaga growing within reach, so Braidy did not have to climb any trees. …

  • Harvest Batch #

    Chaga Harvest Batch #0418

    Braidy and I harvested this batch of Chaga on April 6th, 7th & 10th, 2018 in the Municipality of Huron Shores.  We spied most of the conks high up in the trees so Braidy was busy setting up safety ropes and carefully climbing these very old Yellow Birches.  More often than not, we find Chaga growing on yellow, rather than white, Birch trees.  We were grateful to find this unusually abundant and stunning array of conks all on one tree (above, center).  We always take good care not to damage any trees or over harvest; so we took about 75% of one conk and left the rest intact to ensure…

  • Chaga info

    Hugging trees is good for you:)

    I am often called a tree-hugger and have been for years. Although I don’t mind the term, it is most often used lightly as a ‘granola’-like stereotype.  What most people don’t realize that I actually love to hug trees; all sorts of trees but especially the really big ones I can’t even begin to reach my arms around!  The action of embracing a tree always generates a great sense of serenity and gratitude within me.  Now there is research to support the notion that hugging trees can benefit not only your mental/emotional/spiritual well-being, but that ‘forest bathing,’ as it is referred to in Japan, can stimulate your immune system and improve…